IMG_8043.JPG

Hi there!

I’m Adi - an accidental yogi, trail runner, and lover of words. And I LOVE to make delicious messes in my kitchen. Thanks for stopping by!

vegan instantpot hoppin' john + a snippet of hoppin' john history

vegan instantpot hoppin' john + a snippet of hoppin' john history

In case you missed my last post, I bought an InstantPot while killing time in a coffee shop in Greenville, South Carolina a couple of weeks ago, and you guys! I’m OBSESSED! In fact, I’m thinking of renaming this whole endeavor to Run Yoga Cook All The Things In An InstantPot. Just kidding. It’d be hard to fit all that on a sticker. Seriously, though… I love this thing so much and you can watch for an InstantPot series in January. For now, though, we are on our last day of 2018, which means a Hoppin’ John is in order. Also, it’s a perfect InstantPot recipe. Fancy that!

I don’t really have a Hoppin’ John story to tell, as I’m not even sure when I first heard about it or how long I’ve been making it. And as I was sorting through my dusty memories trying to find those answers, it occurred to me that I really didn’t even know why it’s a popular New Years Day dish. The nerd in me did an impulse Google search that quickly led me down the Hoppin’ John rabbit hole. Now pardon me if I’m about to tell you something you already know, but what I found was too fun to not share.

Ironically enough, this is a popular southern dish, and, though it’s American with Caribbean, French, and African roots, it’s mainly associated with the Carolinas. I love those little coincidences! Because of this, it’s fairly commonly known as Carolina Peas and Rice, and it’s often paired with collard greens, and/or cornbread, with each item symbolizing something for the New Year. Working backward, the cornbread represents gold, the greens represent paper money, and the peas themselves represent coins. Random side note: if you eat the leftovers on January 2nd, the name changes to Skippin’ Jenny, as it signifies your commitment to frugality.

A couple of theories on the name:
1) An obscure, yet customary way for a South Carolinian to invite a guest to eat was to say “Hop in, John.” I find this one silly.
2) When his wife finished the dish, a man called John came “a hoppin’ to eat it.” Again, a bit silly.
3) An old man called Hoppin’ John created a name for himself by selling peas and rice on the streets of Charleston. Seems plausible, but why did they call him Hoppin’?
4) Slave children hopped around the table, eager to dig into the dish. I guess they were all named John?

In any case, it’s as ubiquitous on New Years Day as champagne and good intentions, and equally delicious! This one isn’t traditional, of course, as I forgo the ham hock and rely on smoked paprika and a touch of liquid smoke to get that flavor profile. I load the veggies and spices because YUM, and though I went simple and cooked some long grain brown rice (in my InstantPot, of course because it can do ANYTHING), farro, millet, or barley would be really nice choices, as well. I brought this to a couple of taste testers and one added Tobasco to hers. Flipping brilliant, I tell you, if you like that sort of thing! As always, if you have some genius ideas to share, leave them in the comments below.

Thank you for hanging with me in 2018, and cheers to an even better year to come!

vegan InstantPot hoppin’ john
serves 6-8

1 medium sweet yellow onion, diced
3 stalks celery, diced
1 medium green bell pepper, diced
1 medium jalapeño, seeded and diced (use only half if you’re extra sensitive to heat)
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
4 1/4 cup veggie broth divided
3/4 tsp dried oregano
2 1/4 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp smoked paprika
1/2 tsp paprika
2 bay leaves
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1/4 tsp sea salt, plus more to taste
1/2 tsp liquid smoke
1 lb dried black eye peas, rinsed
rice, quinoa, barley, or farro for serving

optional toppings:
sliced green onions
hot sauce (tobacco is on point for this one)

1) Press the sauté button on your InstantPot. After it comes on, add 1/4 cup of the veggie broth, onion, celery, bell pepper, jalapeño, and garlic, and sauté until the veggies begin to soften. A little browning is a good thing, but stir regularly to prevent scorching.

vegan instant pot hoppin john veggies

rows of veggies

because YUM!

2) Stir in the seasonings (oregano, thyme, smoked paprika, paprika, bay leaves, black pepper, and sea salt), and continue sautéing for another 2-3 minutes, stirring frequently.

vegan instant pot hoppin john spices

loads of herbs & spices

because again, YUM!

3) Add the remaining 4 cups of veggie broth, black eye peas, and liquid smoke. Give it a stir and then switch the InstantPot settings to pressure cook on high for 17 minutes. Once it’s finished cooking, be sure to allow the pressure to release naturally. Taste for seasonings and adjust as necessary.
4) Serve over your grain of choice and top with green onions, hot sauce, or whatever you’re feeling!

VeganHoppinJohn7Web6000.jpg

it’s hard to make a bowl of beans look sexy

but i’ll sure try

vegan instant pot hoppin john

vegan instantpot hoppin’ john

roll that beautiful bean footage, right to a close up view



notes: If you don’t have an InstantPot, no worries! It can obviously be made in any pressure cooker by following your manufacturer’s directions. Alternatively, you can make it on the stovepot following basic stew instructions, but you’ll need to soak the black eye peas for at least 8 hours or overnight (unless you are able to get your hands on some fresh ones). You could also use 3 or 4 cans of black eye peas, if that’s your jam.


vegan InstantPot hoppin’ john
serves 6-8

1 medium sweet yellow onion, diced
3 stalks celery, diced
1 medium green bell pepper, diced
1 medium jalapeño, seeded and diced (use only half if you’re extra sensitive to heat)
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
4 1/4 cup veggie broth divided
3/4 tsp dried oregano
2 1/4 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp smoked paprika
1/2 tsp paprika
2 bay leaves
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1/4 tsp sea salt, plus more to taste
1/2 tsp liquid smoke
1 lb dried black eye peas, rinsed
rice, quinoa, barley, or farro for serving

optional toppings:
sliced green onions
hot sauce (tobacco is on point for this one)

1) Press the sauté button on your InstantPot. After it comes on, add 1/4 cup of the veggie broth, onion, celery, bell pepper, jalapeño, and garlic, and sauté until the veggies begin to soften. A little browning is a good thing, but stir regularly to prevent scorching.
2) Stir in the seasonings (oregano, thyme, smoked paprika, paprika, bay leaves, black pepper, and sea salt), and continue sautéing for another 2-3 minutes, stirring frequently.
3) Add the remaining 4 cups of veggie broth, black eye peas, and liquid smoke. Give it a stir and then switch the InstantPot settings to pressure cook on high for 17 minutes. Once it’s finished cooking, be sure to allow the pressure to release naturally. Taste for seasonings and adjust as necessary.
4) Serve over your grain of choice and top with green onions, hot sauce, or whatever you’re feeling!

notes: If you don’t have an InstantPot, no worries! It can obviously be made in any pressure cooker by following your manufacturer’s directions. Alternatively, you can make it on the stovepot following basic stew instructions, but you’ll need to soak the black eye peas for at least 8 hours or overnight (unless you are able to get your hands on some fresh ones). You could also use 3 or 4 cans of black eye peas, if that’s your jam.

PB&J chia seed pudding: a new take on an old classic

PB&J chia seed pudding: a new take on an old classic

the creamiest InstantPot steel cut oats + my decade long oatmeal streak

the creamiest InstantPot steel cut oats + my decade long oatmeal streak